A Visit to The Sydney Opera House, Australia

Sydney Opera House Australia

As you know, I am in Sydney, Australia right now. It is a really fun city.

A few days, I went to the relatively famous Sydney Opera House, Australia, And My Trip to The Sydney Opera House was pretty awesome

First of all, I have to say that my visit to Sydney Opera House was quite interesting. Most of the fun things don’t just come from the performers and also the architecture. It has been designed in such a futuristic architecture that was built very differently from most houses and miscellaneous buildings. That includes banks, markets etc. If you want to get a present for someone, here is a great lego option. This is a great lego reproduction of Sydney Opera House design It’s pretty good lego architecture of the sydney opera house. 

The thing that made it stand out was how it was designed. It was built in a caved-in landmark, curving in wings, but it was actually imagined and inspired by an orange peel and the segments. As our tour guide said, it was only a way to make a curved building like that previously unheard of at the time, it was also relatively easy. Due to the structure of the orange curvature and only kept up with a lot of different materials and different techniques that

made it practically a revolutionary architecture.

The inside of the opera house looked relatively normal. If you could imagine the inside of an opera house, not too grand and out of the world, you would get somewhere half close to the inside of the Sydney Opera House. Different kinds of looks and sets. Sadly, we were not allowed to take the inside picture. But I can give you most of the outside pictures.  Other than that, there were a few funny little details.

Funny little stories about The Sydney Opera House Australia

Flying chicken! It was quite a big stage with an orchestra pit underneath the stage. And, according to what we learned, in one of the plays, known as ‘The Elixir of Love’ set in a farm, they used actual farm animals. Turns out that literally during the play, one of the chickens got a little adventurous. She took at a leap of faith straight into the pit and landed on the cellist. The cellist had no time to think through! Everything was going right and there was a chicken on his head. The cellist solved the problem by immediately tossing straight to the audience. I would say that would be quite the three pointer by chicken basketball rules. Other than that, the environment was quite interesting.

Drama Queens! Outside the large hall, there was a big purple carpet. Although this design choice may seem fine to a lot of people, it was quite a poor design choice. Apparently a lot of musicians and actors and such who can be seen in opera houses tend to be quite superstitious. Although normally the color purple would signify royalty to most people, it is considered bad luck by a lot of musicians. Apparently, they once had Pavarotti himself performing one of the operas, but he refused to do it because of the purple carpet. He just refused to go near it. So just go get Pavarotti on the opera, they had to completely cover it up. As it turns out, the one color Pavarotti hated more than purple was orange and the poor Sydney Opera House had to learn it the hard way. You  might want to fact-check me on the color they changed it to, maybe it was red.

Honestly, it turned out to be a pretty fun trip. After that, we got some dinner and just enjoyed ourselves. It was a fun night overall. Now I am going to give you a few Sydney Opera House pictures that I took during and post tour.

IMG_3407 IMG_3408 IMG_3409 IMG_3410 IMG_3411 Sydney Opera House Design Sydney Opera House Pictures Sydney Opera House Design Sydney Opera House Design Sydney Opera House Design Sydney Opera House Australia Sydney Opera House Australia IMG_3427

7 thoughts on “A Visit to The Sydney Opera House, Australia

  1. You are rocking that bow tie, nephew!

    The Sydney Opera House roof is reminiscent of The Peter B Lewis Building that houses the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University in the city of your birth. The design caused me to check and see if they were both designed by the same architect. They were not but Frank Gehry, architect of PBL, was clearly influenced by Jorn Utzon, the Danish-born architect of the SOH. You might want to read Utzon’s obit here: http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-utzon30-2008nov30-story.html#page=1

    1. Richard, Thanks for sharing that link. I enjoyed reading it. I see that Utzon visited Taliesen in Arizona, which Viyan and I visited with a friend a couple of months ago. Viyan has gorgeous pictures of the place that he should post here!

  2. Richard, Thanks for sharing that link. I enjoyed reading it. I see that Utzon visited Taliesen in Arizona, which Viyan and I visited with a friend a couple of months ago. Viyan has gorgeous pictures of the place that he should post here!

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